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600 W 9TH ST #209 | $439,000

600 W 9TH ST #209 | $439,000

600 W 9TH ST #209 | $439,000

Agent: Rafik Ghazarian – Phone:213.221.7579

DRE: 01890294

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January 7, 2013 · 9:45 am

Former Pacific Electric Edendale Cut (Los Angeles, California)

Former Pacific Electric Edendale Cut (Los Angeles, California)

This unpaved road (some of which is now known as Silver Lake Ct.) was the former route of the Glendale and Burbank interurban railway lines operated by Pacific Electric. The line crossed Fletcher Avenue over a viaduct before continuing along a hillside ledge to the Monte Sano stop at Glendale Blvd. and Riverside Drive. The line was constructed in 1904 and abandoned in 1955.

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December 5, 2012 · 12:27 pm

Circular Bridge

Circular Bridge

Once again overlooking the valley, the Mount Lowe train made a broad sweep around Circular Bridge. The design of the bridge, more at a trestle, was to allow the trolley to negotiate a 12-foot switch back, over 500 feet of track, at a 4% grade in a 340° turn. The wooden structure resembled a section of roller coaster offering an awesome sight over the side of the car looking almost 100 feet straight down.

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November 28, 2012 · 1:30 pm

Rubio Pavilion

Rubio Pavilion

The beautiful three-story Rubio Pavilion and Hotel (1893 – 1909) was the center of tourist activities in Rubio Canyon. Hotel Rubio had 10 hotel rooms, a below-deck dining room and dance floor. Over a mile of planked walks and stairways with more than a thousand steps led to nine of the beautiful waterfalls of Rubio Canyon. At night, over 2,000 illuminated Japanese lanterns lit the pathway. The Pavilion was one end of the Rubio Incline where passengers experienced a thrilling ride up the 59% average grade of the Incline in “White Chariots”, open-air cars moved by powerful machinery.

But the glory of the Rubio Canyon attractions did not last long. By 1903, storm damage from boulders in Rubio Creek had washed away much of the underfloor, the lower part of the Pavilion was declared unsafe and the hotel was closed. In 1909, an unseasonable electrical storm and flash flood tore out the Rubio Pavilion and buried one of the caretakers’ children in the mud. The injured parents spent years in the hospital recuperating from the devastation that left them trapped in the rubble of the Pavilion. Three of the children, who knew how to actuate the incline cars, escaped to the top of the incline. Rubio Canyon became just a transfer point from the Pacific Electric standard passenger trolley cars to the Incline cars

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November 28, 2012 · 10:56 am

A New Landmark is Coming to Boyle Heights

A New Landmark is Coming to Boyle Heights

This project will transform the community by celebrating and embracing the unique character of this vibrant Los Angeles neighborhood, while at the same time pro
viding the “best-in-class” housing, office and retail that the area deserves. The new improved layout will provide convenient and easy connections to schools, shops, restaurants, jobs, mass transit, freeways and local neighborhoods.

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November 26, 2012 · 1:26 pm

Sears, Roebuck & Company Mail Order Building (Los Angeles, California)

Sears, Roebuck & Company Mail Order Building (Los Angeles, California)

Built in 1927 as a distribution center for the company’s mail order department. The building served that function until 1992, when Sears closed its Los Angeles distribution center and sold the building. Though Sears still operates a retail store on the ground floor, the rest of the enormous complex has remained vacant since 1992. The “Sears” logo on the tower is lit up at night and can be seen for miles around. Considered an Eastside landmark building contemporaneous to the Bullocks Wilshire.

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November 26, 2012 · 11:39 am

Inner City Arts (Los Angeles, California)

Inner City Arts (Los Angeles, California)

Founded in 1989 by Bob Bates and Irwin Jaeger, Inner-City Arts was created to provide arts education at a time when the Los Angeles Unified School District had eliminated most of its arts programs due to budget cuts.
Holding studios, classrooms and performance space, with parking on the rooftop of one of the buildings, ICA provides arts instruction to students from 30 elementary schools, three middle schools and four high schools. Many of the kids it serves live in the neighborhood, others come from families that are chronically homeless.
The ICA job was the first substantial commission Michael Maltzan landed after leaving Frank Gehry’s office to start his own practice.
On the initial phase of the nonprofit’s building campaign, which was completed in 1994, Maltzan teamed up with Marmol Radziner and Associates to turn an old auto repair shop into a high-ceilinged suite of classrooms and studios while adding a new ceramics building and small outbuilding. The new construction includes a wedge-shaped library, a black box theater, office space for the staff and an expanded ceramics wing.
Maltzan, who worked pro bono on the project, approached it from the beginning as a kind of urban planning. After the first phase of construction, as ICA worked to acquire adjacent parcels of land, he prepared not one but two master plans for the organization. The rhythm and ultimately the personality of the finished product is drawn largely from the way you move through it from sidewalk to garden to studio and back again. Each of the new buildings is pulled or crisply folded back at one or all of its corners. A pair of towers, with an ICA logo running vertically, allow it to be seen from several blocks away.

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November 26, 2012 · 11:36 am